Doosan Cobot VS Universal Robots (UR)

Doosan Cobot VS Universal Robots (UR)

By on May 3rd, 2019 in Robotics

Since the introduction of the Doosan Cobot in the United States at Automate held in Chicago in April 2019, I have had at least fifty people ask me: “So Rohan, how is the Doosan Cobot different/ better than the UR?” This article is specifically to address that question. Apart from the fact that they have a 6-axis arm each, the robots have massive differences in terms of build, operations and interface with the programmer. Below are some of the most prominent differences in the two robots:

  1. Force Sensing: The UR uses a force sensing method where the robot measures the current drawn by the joints of the robot to quantify the force experienced by the robot. The Doosan Cobot on the other hand has 6 joint torque sensors, one on each of its axis to measure the force experienced by the robot. The UR Robot promises ±10N of accuracy in force mode. Even though official numbers are not yet released, Doosan unofficially claims 0.2N of accuracy which is 50 times better than that of the UR. This can be attributed to directly measuring the force against using current to estimate force.
  2. Robot Control: The Doosan Cobot has a “Cockpit” option which is essentially a control unit on the robot arm that allows us to move the robot in free mode by pressing a button on the robot. This essentially releases the brakes from the joints and allows the operator to move the robot freely. Two other customizable buttons on the cockpit allow the user to move the robot in 2 of the 4 motion options- “Z axis only”, “X-Y plane only”, ”Lock Orientation”, “Lock TCP”. This makes the robot very easy to program by moving the robot to specific arm positions. The UR on the other hand has no control unit on the robot and all robot control lies on the teach pendant.
  3. Ways of programing: While both the UR and the Doosan robots can be programmed using their respective programing languages (which are by the way very similar), and their python based scripts, the Doosan Cobot has a third way of template based programing called “task builder”. The main intention of this seems to be ease of programing at the operator level. Task builder templates like “pick”, “place”, “insert”, etc. can be created in either python or the python based Doosan language by the engineers. The robot can be handed down to operators for easy programing using these templates.
  4. Payloads and reach: While the URs come in 3 variations ranging from 3kg to 10 kg payloads, with reach ranging from 0.5m to 1.3m, the Doosan Cobots are available in 4 variations with payloads ranging from 6kg to 15kg and the reach ranging from 0.9m all the way up to 1.7m.

There are many more differences in the controller and the teach pendant of the 2 robots. When it comes to technical specifications however, the Doosan seems to be a clear winner. The real advantage the UR has over Doosan though is its vast outreach, its integration capabilities with other systems using the UR+ platform, and the head start it has in the market over the Doosan Cobot. But looking at the way Doosan functions as a company, its work culture and its massive drive for success, it will not be surprising if Doosan captures a fair share of the Cobot market in the near future.